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Workshops

This three day conference will feature over 60 workshops framed by the Georgia ASYD Quality Standards. Click below to see workshop descriptions and locations for each block. To download the full list of workshops, click here.

Don’t know which workshops to attend? Click here for a survey to assist you with determining the breakout session offerings from which your program and staff will most benefit.

 

Tuesday, September 21st

Workshop Block 1

Workshop Block 2

Workshop Block 3

 

Wednesday, September 22nd

Workshop Block 4

Workshop Block 5

Workshop Block 6

Workshop Block 7

 

Friday, September 23rd

Youth Development Cafe


Workshop Block 1

Tuesday,  Sept. 21st from 11:00 AM-12:30 PM

 

The Winning Formula for Youth Impact (Julian Rimple and Shauna-Kaye Davis, Boys & Girls Club of Metro Atlanta, Inc.)

Location:  Room 201

The purpose of this session is to develop in-depth knowledge, skills and understanding of the importance of youths’ need to become effective leaders within culturally diverse communities. It is never too early to begin sowing impressions of youth leadership into students. The cultural and community influence needed to globally impact the world is in our youths’ hands. In this session, we will learn how to implement an intentional model of connectivity, leadership development and cultural influences that will create the strong and driven youth leaders that we need today.

STEM: Literacy, Nutrition, Fitness & Dance (Debby Mitchell, UCF – GeoMotion TV)

Location: Room 205

We offer “plug and play” programming to support academics, fitness and dance. Children love to move! Being physically active changes the energy in the room, provides greater focus and increased brain functioning. Come discover how to use meaningful movement and fun to give your children’s brains a workout and improves their knowledge in nutrition, science, health and fitness concepts. Move to “Simple Machines, Pump Up the Pronouns, Be a Civil Engineer,” etc.! Also learn a hip-hop or Latin dance routine or participate in kickboxing, yoga and more.

Engaging Students with Literature and Film (Michael Buchanan, Engaging Students with Literature and Film)

Location: Room 202

Engagement is vital in education. Author Michael Buchanan shares engaging books and movies that elicit empathy in students while providing a platform for discussion of teen issues. Literature and film can also offer emotional support for students who need to know they are not alone. Buchanan will discuss lesson plans of selected works.

Teen Dating Violence: Identifying and Maintaining Healthy Relationships (Tomieka Daniel, Georgia Legal Services Program)

**THIS WORKSHOP HAS UNFORTUNATELY BEEN CANCELED.

 

Every student has the right to a safe and healthy relationship. By conducting these workshops, the goal is to educate and empower young people regarding their rights to be free from dating violence. Another goal is to educate and empower parents, educators and school administrators on how to keep teens safe if they learn that a teen is in a dating violence relationship.

Aspects of Identity (Kevin Wanzer)

Location: Sycamore

This session invites you to embrace various aspects of your identity and how you really feel about differences. This interactive and experiential program engages everyone…even the “unengageable” and allows diverse people a unique opportunity to celebrate their you-niqueness and take part in thoughtful conversation – both in a fun and non-threatening context. It is a powerful and memorable experience that can powerfully impact participants as leaders and stay with them through life.

Think Inside the Lunch Box (Shiona Curry, S.N.A.C. it up!)

Location: Room 212

In this interactive workshop, a 12-year-old motivational speaker will present on behalf of youth, clarifying what they bring inside of their physical and emotional lunch boxes. Recognizing the correlation between diet and the mind, Shi will paint a clear picture for participants.

Destination Imagination (Annette Rogers, Destination Imagination)

Location: Room 203

Attendees will receive an overview of the Destination Imagination program and a free “Try DI” STEM/PBL Mini Challenge, which has at least 10 classroom/group activities and links to other DI resources to take back to your school/program. These activities are suitable for all grade levels. Students are grouped into teams of up to seven for hands-on learning. Students of all ages (K -University) love doing DI!

Change Management in a Youth Development Setting (Kimberly Reaves, Independent Youth Development Consultant)

Location: Room 207

This session will be conducted as an experiential learning session that will explore the common barriers to achieving successful cycles of continuous change in your afterschool youth development work environment. We will define change and examine what it means to execute sustainable change in a programmatic human services setting. We will delve into the traditional staff roles and best practices on leading change, managing change and being an agent of change. When organizational change occurs, what is the impact on the youth, the direct services staff, the community and the parents? This session will use the approach of the The David P. Weikart Center for Youth Program Quality, which empowers education and human service leaders to adapt, implement and scale best-in-class, research validated quality improvement systems to advance child and youth development. As it is normal for organizational change to occur, these strategies are based on positive youth development research and the desire to create a safe, supportive and productive environment for youth.

How to Include Youth Voice in Program Evaluation (Rachel Alterman-Wallack, Next Level Consulting)

Location: Foundry A

This session is most relevant to teen-serving organizations. It will not focus on specific evaluation tools but rather building the capacity of including meaningful youth participants as stakeholders in planning and implementing program evaluation. Youth input is one standard (1.6, 1.8) of quality programming, but it’s not restricted to just student choice or creative output in program activities. Designing program goals, outcomes and even a logic model are opportunities for youth involvement! Youth input can help us craft the best possible model and develop target outcomes and strategies that really hit their mark! Get ready to play, design, discuss.

Hope Lives Here: The Power of Growing Intentional Families and Communities (Tracy Cunningham, On Point)

Location: Room 213

In this fun, interactive session, participants will gain proven strategies for engaging parents and adults in building a community which values youth. Without successful frameworks to strengthen young people and meet their needs, communities’ potential to create a competitive workforce, strong social supports, vibrant families and future leaders is lost. However, when communities view youth as holistic resources with amazing strengths and limitless potential, young people flourish and discover these truths about themselves. Mobilizing cross sectors around a shared language and vision can be daunting. Therefore, this workshop will explore creative methods for building the 40 Developmental Assets and introduce Search’s recent research on the Developmental Relationships which help youth thrive.

Workshop Block 2

Tuesday,  Sept. 21st from 2:00 -3:30 PM

 

MUSIC POWER ACTION – Music & Movies to Engage (Eric Rowles, Leading To Change)

Location: Room 203

What’s the connection between Kendrick Lamarr and Fifth Harmony? From T.I. & Taylor Swift to X-Men and The Hunger Games? Come to this tool-filled workshop to learn how to use over 20 different LEGAL and FREE media tools, including TODAY’S MUSIC and MOVIES, in your cutting edge work with young people.

Chasing the Debt-Free Degree (Jessica Johnson, The Scholarship Academy)

Location:  Room 201

The “#debtfreedegreezone” challenges youth service providers to break free of the cookie-cutter approach to financial aid support. Through a series of financial aid scenarios, participants will learn how to develop strategies to increase student eligibility for top private dollars by empowering students to build their scholarship brand. The session will explore tailored scholarship research strategies and discuss some of the trends in financial aid access that could be leveraged to help students graduate from college with the least amount of debt.

Math Can Be “A-MAZE-ING” After 3pm! (Kim Aycock, Camp 2 Campus Learning Solutions)

Location: Foundry B

Learn multiple team building activities such as the “Electric Maze,” that will reinforce what is being taught in middle and high school math classrooms. Using this approach in your program will give students a refreshing view on math because they will learn important skills and strategies without doing a mountain of worksheets. Don’t be surprised if you hear them say that math is AMAZING!

Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (Justin Hill, Georgia Department of Education)

Location: Room 212

PBIS is a framework or approach for assisting school personnel in adopting and organizing evidence-based behavioral interventions into an integrated continuum that enhances academic and social behavior outcomes for all students. PBIS is a prevention-oriented way for school personnel to organize evidence-based practices, improve their implementation of those practices and maximize academic and social behavior outcomes for students. PBIS supports the success of ALL students.

Breaking New Ground (Jammal Lee, Jammal Lee Speaks)

Location: Room 202

The Breaking New Ground workshop is designed to teach participants how to create a welcoming and empowering facility/environment to enhance their program in meeting the needs of their participants. This approach enhances the opportunity for each participant to engage each of their youth to make a personal investment into the outcomes in their own lives, as well as having a personal investment in the success of the program that they participate in.

Building Relationships Across the Board (Issa Prescott, HTI Catalysts)

Location: Room 211

In this session, participants will engage in fun and interactive relationship-building activities. Using the ASYD Relationships standards, participants will reflect on their own programs’ strengths and areas for growth. There will be opportunities to help colleagues address their program challenges and review the resources provided related to relationships. The session will close with a set of activities that continue to build relationships among the group.

Just Dance (Debby Mitchell, UCF College of Education – GeoMotion TV)

Location: Room 205

In this active session, participants will take part in the newest fitness craze, dancing for fitness. This innovative method is for anyone who thinks they can’t dance. Learn a system that utilizes an easy method for learning hip-hop, Latin, dancing to the oldies and partner, and it’s non-stop!

Power Up for 30, Part 1 (Lee Ann Else and Sequoya Howard, HealthMPowers)

Location: Room 101

Time to Power Up for 30! A statewide training with the goal of ensuring every youth has the opportunity to be physically active for 30 minutes in the after school setting. The training and resources were adapted from the successful Power Up for 30 Elementary School initiative. During the high energy training, the afterschool providers will learn about Georgia Shape Power Up for 30, the importance of physical activity and experience resources in action. They will learn about the NAA Healthy Eating Physical Activity Standards and create an implementation plan for their site. Resources will be provided to help out of school time sites engage all youth in physical activity throughout their program. This is a two-part workshop and attendees need to attend both sessions.

Developing Today’s Afterschool Youth Development Workforce (William Kearney, E-QYP | Equipping Quality Youth Professionals)

Location: Room 209

Today’s best afterschool and youth development organizations have a commitment to staff and volunteer development and providing the resources, training and tools for staff and volunteer success with the young people they serve. They harness the talent and passion of a creative, connected workforce and volunteer force to drive innovative services and activities for young people and the positive relationships between staff, youth and parents that result. This engaging, interactive session will allow participants to assess where their organization currently is and identify steps that can be taken to shift to a staff/volunteer-enable management model, from a management-driven management model. By attending this session, you can learn to lower staff and volunteer frustration and turnover, improve relationships and expand and enhance program activities and offerings currently provided.

Change Management in a Youth Development Setting (Kimberly Reaves,  Independent Youth Development Consultant)

Location: Room 207

This session will be conducted as an experiential learning session that will explore the common barriers to achieving successful cycles of continuous change in your afterschool youth development work environment. We will define change and examine what it means to execute sustainable change in a programmatic human services setting. We will delve into the traditional staff roles and best practices on leading change, managing change and being an agent of change. When organizational change occurs, what is the impact on the youth, the direct services staff, the community and the parents? This session will use the approach of the The David P. Weikart Center for Youth Program Quality, which empowers education and human service leaders to adapt, implement and scale best-in-class, research validated quality improvement systems to advance child and youth development. As it is normal for organizational change to occur, these strategies are based on positive youth development research and the desire to create a safe, supportive and productive environment for youth.

Introduction to the Georgia Afterschool and Youth Development Standards (Mary Kate Chapman, GUIDE, Inc. )

Location: Foundry A

The Georgia Afterschool and Youth Development Quality Standards is a collaborative project funded and endorsed by several state agencies and offered to all youth development programs across the state as an opportunity to increase program quality. The Standards are grounded in research and best practices and include an easy-to-use self-assessment tool. This workshop will give participants insight into the Standards and how they could be used to evaluate and increase program quality.

Hope Lives Here: The Power of Growing Intentional Families and Communities (Tracy Cunningham, On Point)

Location: Room 213

In this fun, interactive session, participants will gain proven strategies for engaging parents and adults in building a community which values youth. Without successful frameworks to strengthen young people and meet their needs, communities’ potential to create a competitive workforce, strong social supports, vibrant families and future leaders is lost. However, when communities view youth as holistic resources with amazing strengths and limitless potential, young people flourish and discover these truths about themselves. Mobilizing cross sectors around a shared language and vision can be daunting. Therefore, this workshop will explore creative methods for building the 40 Developmental Assets and introduce Search’s recent research on the Developmental Relationships which help youth thrive.

Workshop Block 3

Tuesday,  Sept. 21st from 4:00 -5:30 PM

 

In Control AND Having Fun? Say It Isn’t So! (Kim Aycock, Camp 2 Campus Learning Solutions)

Location: Foundry B

This session will explore what it takes to be an effective group leader and have the right amount of control without taking away the fun of being in your program. Setting expectations that invite participant input is paramount to establishing control with each group. Strategies that get kids to “tune in” and “buy in,” form groups using creative methods, anticipate transitions and encourage more desired behaviors are just a FEW of the many ways this session will investigate how to be in control AND have fun!

Cultivating a Culture of Creativity: Transforming Youth Development Programming Using Spaghetti, Shaving Cream and SPAM (Kasey Bozeman, University of Georgia/Georgia 4-H)

Location: Room 213

Ever thought about ways to spice up your traditional youth development but didn’t know where to start? How do you enhance existing activities while still building life skills in youth? Join the interactive workshop that discusses the concepts of creativity, innovation and transformative youth development activities, along with the fun of a life-size hungry, hungry hippos game, a pool of 150 lbs of spaghetti noodles, finger painting the Declaration of Independence and carving SPAM. This is sure to be innovative, interesting and possibly a little icky – you surely don’t want to miss out!

STEAMettes: How To Get Girls Interested in Coding Through Fashion (Tiffany Ray and Emily Rahm, Generation Infocus/STEAMettes)

Location: Room 211

This workshop encouraging girls to adopt a vision to become agents of change through computer coding while enjoying the commonality of fashion design. Participants will learn the overview and implementation strategies for STEAM Labs connected to the school day, through standards alignment, that help sustain a school culture and instructional program conducive to heightening student learning through real world connected STEAM Labs.

Creative Group Projects to Change Your Environment (Mary Kate Chapman, GUIDE, Inc. )

Location: Foundry A

Want to make your afterschool space one that is inviting and youth friendly? Want to learn how to incorporate youth voice into your space? Join us for this hands-on, engaging workshop! You’ll learn how environments condition how youth feel, think, behave and perform. Better yet? You’ll walk away with tools for developing, fostering and supporting youth through the creation and design of meaningful learning environments. We can’t wait to spend this time with YOU!

Building Relationships on Purpose (Jammal Lee, Jammal Lee Speaks)

Location: Room 202

This workshop is designed to give youth development professionals the skills to build strong, healthy relationships with program participants and their families that will increase engagement and participation in afterschool or out-of-school programs.

Self -Expression IS Social Emotional Learning: Here’s How (Susan Landrum, VOX Teen Communication)

Location: Room 206

We all know that research from a variety of fields — from neuroscience to psychology — shows how social and emotional skills (SEL) are critical for boosting young people’s outcomes for success in school and in life. There’s a surefire way to increase your program’s success in fostering SEL skills that will also amplify your organization’s impact. We’ll experience hands-on self-expression activities that build young people’s confidence and capabilities, amplify their voices and help them connect with each other. Voice is fundamental to that process, and VOX brings you self-expression activities for the youth you serve to build this process into any afterschool program.

Power Up for 30, Part 2 (Lee Ann Else and Sequoya Howard, HealthMPowers)

Location: Room 101

Time to Power Up for 30! A statewide training with the goal of ensuring every youth has the opportunity to be physically active for 30 minutes in the after school setting. The training and resources were adapted from the successful Power Up for 30 Elementary School initiative. During the high energy training, the after school providers will learn about Georgia Shape Power Up for 30, the importance of physical activity ,a nd experience resources in action. They will learn about the NAA Healthy Eating Physical Activity Standards and create an implementation plan for their site. Resources will be provided to help out of school time sites engage all youth in physical activity. throughout their program. This is a two-part workshop and attendees need to attend both sessions.

Dare to be Critiqued: Enhancing Your Relationship Management Skills (Tracy Horton, Charter Oak State College)

Location: Room 204

Emotional Intelligence encompasses many components such as self-awareness and management, social awareness and relationship management. What makes the Relationship Management (RM) area unique is that it taps into skills and abilities of cultivating bonds with others over time. Come join this interactive training session and learn the seven Relationship Management Competencies, a tool that may be used to obtain a “360” critique of your (RM) abilities, and develop a plan for your own personal (RM) growth.

Change Management in a Youth Development Setting (Kimberly Reaves, Independent Youth Development Consultant)

Location: Room 207

This session will be conducted as an experiential learning session that will explore the common barriers to achieving successful cycles of continuous change in your afterschool youth development work environment. We will define change and examine what it means to execute sustainable change in a programmatic human services setting. We will delve into the traditional aff roles and best practices on leading change, managing change and being an agent of change.st When organizational change occurs, what is the impact on the youth, the direct services staff, the community and the parents? This session will use the approach of the The David P. Weikart Center for Youth Program Quality, which empowers education and human service leaders to adapt, implement and scale best-in-class, research validated quality improvement systems to advance child and youth development. As it is normal for organizational change to occur, these strategies are based on positive youth development research and the desire to create a safe, supportive and productive environment for youth.

Formative Evaluation – Using Participant Feedback During a Program to Help Achieve to Your Target Outcomes (Rachel Alterman-Wallack, Next Level Consulting)

Location: Room 209

You can assess outcomes regularly, but without meaningful input from the primary stakeholder, young people themselves, how can any improvement strategy actually make a significant difference? This session will engage participants in activities and discussion about soliciting meaningful, relevant and real-time data from the young people to make quality improvements along the way. Get ready to move, role play, consider new ideas and discuss.

Got Parents? Strategies To Engage Beyond Carpool! (Eric Rowles, Leading To Change)

Location: Room 203

If it takes a village to raise the child, how do you get the villagers to partner with you beyond permission slips and carpool pickup? Don’t miss this tool-and-example filled workshop that showcases six different strategies and approaches to effectively attract and engage parents and caretakers!

STEM in Afterschool: Opportunities and Resources (Anita Krishnamurthi, Afterschool Alliance )

Location: Room 102

Afterschool programs are now recognized as crucial partners in improving STEM education. A wide variety of stakeholders ranging from funders, employers, policymakers and partners in STEM education are eager to engage with afterschool providers. This session will provide tips on how to tap into these resources to offer high-quality programs.

Workshop Block 4

Wednesday,  Sept. 22nd from 9:00 -10:30 AM

 

The “Peach Pie Players”: Cultivating Young Performers (Janie Jones, Brooks County Schools 21st CCLC)

Location:  Room 205

This interactive session will include acting and improvisational techniques that are quick, inexpensive, effective and especially geared toward afterschool and summer program formats. From impromptu skits to fairy tales, these exercises will bring out the thespian in your students and staff members, encouraging spontaneity and creativity. Become an honorary member of the “Peach Pie Players” as we go through practical drama enrichment exercises that anyone can teach to all ages and begin using immediately. The cultivation and nourishment of dramatic expression in young people is a vital component to their self-esteem and confidence. Samples of lesson plans and supplies will be available. It’s the kind of drama that you will actually enjoy having in your program!

Facilitating The Heat Without Getting Burned (Eric Rowles, Leading to Change)

Location:  Room 203

Drama. Tension. Conflict. There are so many heated topics and challenges that our youth face today… how can you support them in making sense of the worlds they navigate? Come  to this heated – but also HEALTHY – dialogue focused workshop to learn how to FACILITATE multiple points of view with young people.

Free Online Resources for Critical Skills Education (Jamal Cornelious, EverFi)

Location:  Room 201

EverFi provides FREE online resources to support students with critical life skills. Attendees will preview our courses ranging from STEM Readiness & Digital Literacy and Responsibility to Financial Literacy & Civic Engagement. Each attendee will receive free login information, standards alignment resources and technical support throughout the year. We have courses for students in grades 4 – 12, so join us and learn about EverFi!

Arts Integration (Ty Woods, Artportunity Knocks)

Location:  Sycamore

This interactive and hands on workshop is designed to teach professionals how to integrate the core arts subjects: Dance, Vocal, Acting and Art into core academic subjects such as math, science, history and reading. During the course of this workshop, attendees will engage in an interactive learning experience designed to display the effectiveness of incorporating the arts into afterschool academic services. This workshop is also ideal for classroom teachers and school administrators looking for innovative ways to engage student learning and increase academic success.

Super Tools: Behavior Management for Super Afterschool Programs (Mike Ashcraft and Chelsea Ashcraft, Children’s Choice)

Location:  Room 202

Have you ever experienced a behavior problem with a child in your program? Of course you have! We all have! Would you like some powerful and practical brain-based discipline tools to help you get the kind of behaviors that make you love working with kids? Attend this session and discover how to create superior interiors and tremendous agendas that promote desirable behavior. Learn strategies for preventing undesirable behavior. Learn techniques to use once misbehavior has occurred: positive discipline, logical consequences, reparations, restitution and self-esteem. Learn many tools that are guaranteed to make guidance and building self-discipline easier and make working with school-age kids more enjoyable!

Power Up for 30, Part 1 (Lee Ann Else and Sequoya Howard, HealthMPowers)

Location:  Room 101

Time to Power Up for 30! A statewide training with the goal of ensuring every youth has the opportunity to be physically active for 30 minutes in the after school setting. The training and resources were adapted from the successful Power Up for 30 Elementary School initiative. During the high energy training, the afterschool providers will learn about Georgia Shape Power Up for 30, the importance of physical activity and experience resources in action. They will learn about the NAA Healthy Eating Physical Activity Standards and create an implementation plan for their site. Resources will be provided to help out of school time sites engage all youth in physical activity throughout their program. This is a two-part workshop and attendees need to attend both sessions.

I Need To Get Out Of This Barrel (Don Miller, YOUNG, BOLD, UNIQUE, Inc.)

Location:  Room 204

This workshop is designed to assist the youth professional in reducing and managing stress within the workplace environment. Individuals will learn techniques and strategies to improve their overall mental, physical, cognitive and emotional capacity among their peers and their students, which impacts their daily productivity and well-being. The techniques and strategies can also be implemented with the students to improve the overall learning environment.

Ethics in Afterschool: How Do You Measure Up? (Jim Murphy, CypherWorx)

Location:  Room 206

Working with children and youth duirng non-school hours is a field that can often raise questions regarding the “right” thing to do or say. We have each been raised with varying types and styles of parenting, which can influence our intuitive responses. Unfortunately, when working with others’ children, in a professional environment, those intuitive responses aren’t always how our employers, or the parents of the children we are working with, want us to respond to or interact with, the youth in our care. Come discuss and learn about the basics of ethics and your ethical responsibilities in after school. We will also dive deeper into the NAA Afterschool Code of Ethics. Come see which areas you are exceling in and where you can focus on improvement.

How to Include Youth Voice in Program Evaluation (Rachel AltermanWallack, Next Level Consulting)

Location:  Room 207

This session is most relevant to teen-serving organizations. It will not focus on specific evaluation tools but rather building the capacity of including meaningful youth participants as stakeholders in planning and implementing program evaluation. Youth input is one standard (1.6, 1.8) of quality programming, but it’s not restricted to just student choice or creative output in program activities. Designing program goals, outcomes and even a logic model are opportunities for youth involvement! Youth input can help us craft the best possible model and develop target outcomes and strategies that really hit their mark! Get ready to play, design, discuss.

Engaging and Supporting Families in Out-of-School-Time Programs (Tracy Horton, Charter Oak State College)

Location:  Room 209

A key stakeholder to engage and support in out-of-school programs are families. Families need our support and guidance more than ever. Learn about the four Council on Accreditation (COA) Quality Standards related to family partnership, support and resources.

Workshop Block 5

Wednesday,  Sept. 22nd from 10:45 AM-12:15 PM

 

Tell and Share Your Youth Program’s Story (Rachel Alterman-Wallack, Youth Today)

Location:  Room 207

Afterschool programs make a transformative difference in the lives of thousands of youth each year. How can you tell the most compelling story about your work and the impact you make to increase awareness for your mission and cause, to recruit more volunteers/participants/families/donors/partners and fuel your mission? This session includes hands-on activities, facilitated by a veteran journalist and youth worker who can help you include strong teens voices in your story telling to find, hone and share your program’s stories.

25 Tools In 75 Minutes: FREE Resources To Raise Our Youth Engagement Game (Eric Rowles, Leading to Change)

Location:  Room 203

Get ready for a LIGHTNING round of proven tools and strategies to raise your youth engagement game. We’ll cover the BEST of technology, program design, media, funding and even afterschool/parent communication methods. You’ll leave with your head spinning, a handout of resources and NEW ideas to take back to your program!

STEAM Labs – School Day Connections (Tiffany Ray and Emily Rahm, Generation Infocus)

Location:  Room 211

This workshop will focus on providing participants with the basic fundamentals of planning, developing and implementing STEAM Labs during the school day and after school. Participants will learn how to create learning opportunities for students connected to the school day that are standard-aligned, learn how hands-on activities can be connected to the general school day school principals school improvement plans and data analysis used to measure program effectiveness and utilized as a tool to encourage community buy-in. We will also encourage and demonstrate the power of STEAM community buy-in through career exposure. This workshop is excellent for 21st Century programs, general afterschool programs, schools looking to become STEM certified and innovative school administrators.

A Quality Rated (QR) Orientation, with an Emphasis on SACERS-U (Michelle Hughes, State of Georgia; Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning, Quality Rated)

Location:  Room 201

This is an introduction to Georgia’s Quality Rated, a voluntary tiered QRIS utilizing a systemic approach to assess, improve and communicate the level of quality in early childhood education and school-age care programs. Quality Rated assigns a quality rating (1 Star, 2 Stars or 3 Stars) to programs that meet a set of defined program standards which exceed minimum requirements. The rating assignment method for school-age care programs will be discussed, including an overview of how points are earned based on documentation in a submitted portfolio, as well as a live, on-site Environmental Rating Scale (ERS) observation. This workshop will include an introduction to the School-Age Care Environment Rating Scale and Updated Edition (SACERS-U), which is the instrument utilized in measuring the process quality portion of the assessment.

Building Relationships Across the Board (Issa Prescott, HTI Catalysts)

Location:  Room 209

In this session, participants will engage in fun and interactive relationship-building activities. Using the ASYD Relationships standards, participants will reflect on their own programs’ strengths and areas for growth. There will be opportunities to help colleagues address their program challenges and review the resources provided related to relationships. The session will close with a set of activities that continue to build relationships among the group.

Mindset Matters: Incorporating Physical Fitness In Your Program (Abby Keenan and John Keenan, Intrepid Performance Consulting)

Location:  Foundry A

Your mindset related to physical fitness impacts others, the youth you serve and your program. By choosing to cultivate a growth mindset, you can set the standard of creating regular opportunities for youth in your program to engage in physical fitness and build healthy habits. In this interactive workshop with sport psychology experts from Intrepid Performance Consulting, you will explore your mindset, brainstorm ideas for getting youth physically active on a regular basis and determine realistic strategies to apply to your program.

Power Up for 30, Part 2 (Lee Ann Else and Sequoya Howard, HealthMPowers)

Location:  Room 101

Time to Power Up for 30! A statewide training with the goal of ensuring every youth has the opportunity to be physically active for 30 minutes in the after school setting. The training and resources were adapted from the successful Power Up for 30 Elementary School initiative. During the high energy training, the after school providers will learn about Georgia Shape Power Up for 30, the importance of physical activity, and experience resources in action. They will learn about the NAA Healthy Eating Physical Activity Standards and create an implementation plan for their site. Resources will be provided to help out of school time sites engage all youth in physical activity. throughout their program. This is a two-part workshop and attendees need to attend both sessions.

Do This, Not That: Put Your Training on a Diet (Kim Aycock, Camp 2 Campus Learning Solutions)

Location:  Foundry B

Learn the truth about your current training methods and discover the best and worst ways to boost learning power. This session will show you how to make simple adjustments that can maximize training time and improve retention of critical information. Leave with strategies to indulge learners by utilizing effective brain-based teaching methods. This is one diet that will satisfy all learners – come hungry!

8 Habits of Highly Effective Afterschool Leaders (Mike Ashcraft and Chelsea Ashcraft, Children’s Choice)

Location:  Room 202

 

How can you be more effective at leading others in the afterschool profession? Attend this event and explore the traits, passions and habits required to be a highly effective afterschool leader. These 8 habits are essential for afterschool professionals in leadership roles: leading kids, mentoring colleagues or supervising staff. Come investigate these powerful elements and learn practical and useful approaches to enhance these traits and transform yourself and others into extraordinary afterschool leaders.

Every Story Counts (Bryetta Calloway, BDC Design and Consulting)

Location:  Room 212

 

With the prevalence of a social and human services based programming, it is important to be able to create content and context through which to convey positive messaging. It is more important than ever to be able to harness the positive effects of your prevention efforts, and this is made possible through the planned integration of intentional infrastructure that allows for the conveyance and aggregation of personal anecdotes, stories of success and positive impact.

Addressing Summer and Afterschool Hunger: Best Practices and Strategies to Successful Program Implementation (Michele Chivore and Torey Repetski, Georgia Food Bank Association)

Location:  Room 213

This workshop is designed for organizations that currently participate in or are interested in participating in federal nutrition programs for summer and afterschool. The session will allow attendees to learn about successful strategies and best practices being implemented across the state and nationally in summer and afterschool programs. The session is interactive and is designed to encourage discussion and sharing among attendees. It will allow them to leave with ideas for implementation in their communities as well as with information on funding opportunities through the Association and other funders.

Workshop Block 6

Wednesday,  Sept. 22nd from 1:30 -3:00 PM

 

Learn How to Increase Diversity Awareness and Reduce Biases in Your Program (Alice Hall, Georgia Southern University)

Location:  Room 201

Quality Standards focus on programming that is culturally appropriate and linguistically sensitive but not all youth development professionals understand how to do this and do it appropriately. Participants will understand personal biases and how they impact relationships and learn how to build relationships with children and families different from ourselves.

Best Practices: Bullying & Cyberbullying Solutions (Michael Carpenter, Independent Consultant)

Location:  Foundry A

This interactive workshop will introduce attendees to research-based best practices that reduce bully/victim behavior through minimizing risks. The focus will be on the skills within the individual, classroom, school-wide and community strategies. Because some administrators, counselors and teachers continue to use methods that have been proven not to work in bullying prevention (i.e., peer mediation, anger management, conflict resolution, zero tolerance and punishment), the literature offers an array of proactive, systemic and comprehensive approaches that uses non-coercive and nonintimidating language. Please join us to discuss these solutions.

The Amazing Power of Play (Chelsea Ashcraft and Mike Ashcraft, Children’s Choice)

Location:  Room 101

Play is not a four-letter word. Well, technically it is, but that’s not the point! Do you feel pressure to do “more school after school” even though you know children want and need time to play? You don’t have to choose between either play or academics. You can stay true to the playful nature and strong positive relationships that make out-of-school time special AND significantly encourage academic success.

Powered By Playworks (Tobie Halliburton, Playworks Education Energized)

Location:  Sycamore

We believe that Play has the power to bring out the best in EVERY kid. In this workshop, participants will actively experience what this looks like, sounds like and feels like. Throughout our workshop we are introduced to the value of play and it’s impact on social emotional development. We lay the foundation for using play to create a safe, healthy and respectful environment for youth. During this workshop participants will also begin to discuss the various barriers that prevent youth from playing more.

From a Slinky to a Smurf: Creating the Framework for Building Positive Relationships as Groups Transform into Communities (Kim Aycock, Camp 2 Campus Learning Solutions)

Location:  Foundry B

A group remains only a collection of people unless they are guided on their journey to evolve into a community. This model teaches how to recognize the stages of group development, encourage growth at each stage through intentional activities and cultivate the progression from group to community by fostering the most important feature of excellent youth development programs – positive relationships. See firsthand how to build the framework for these positive relationships by establishing constructive group norms and building blocks for communication, teamwork and trust.

Healing Invisible Wounds: Helping Youth Overcome Trauma While Enhancing their Well-Being (Dr. Marina Gillmore, SPARK Center for Professional and Personal Renewal, Inc.)

Location:  Room 202

The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2016 KIDS COUNT Data Book ranked Georgia 42nd in overall child wellness among all 50 U.S. states. This interactive workshop will give participants hands-on applications to understanding trauma-informed care and its role in serving youth. This workshop will particularly focus on strategies to meet the needs of our most disenfranchised, underserved and at-risk youth. Participants will engage in a case study simulation and community resource audit to help them create strategies that will work within the framework of their existing programs. The session will provide tools that programs can share with families to expand upon program work. Using recent national data, participants will leave with recommendations for best practices to enhance the physical, emotional and psychological well-being of the youth they serve and will be equipped with strategies and resources they can use immediately with their youth and families.

Feeding Teens, Fueling Voices (Susan Landrum and Josie Footmon-Smith, VOX Teen Communications)

Location:  Room 204

Afterschool service providers know the importance of feeding teens to keep their bodies and minds fueled for program activities. But there is so much more to eating than just food. Snacks and meals can be an opportunity to build community, learn about one another and level the playing field. Food is also a way to celebrate, to model healthy behaviors and tell personal stories. So, let’s eat! Come and discuss the ways you use food at your organization. Brainstorm and learn how to prepare healthy meals on a budget with limited resources (i.e., a crockpot and an electric skillet). Trade ideas on how to incorporate food as an intentional part of your programming. Last but not least, let’s talk about how we can inform this practice with teen voice.

PLAYING WITH FIRE: Conflict, Communication and Your TRUE COLORS of Leadership (Eric Rowles, Leading to Change)

Location:  Room 203

What is YOUR leadership style? How can your style work in conjunction with different leadership styles? Furthemore, what are some of the potential conflicts, partnerships, clashes and compliments that your style can have with those around you? Often we immediately assess workplace confict as an inevitable outcome of the diverse workstyles around us. However, skilled out-of -school time professionals can utilize a tool like True Colors to not only forecast the different approaches used in the workplace but also bridge the divide that often exists between coworkers utilizing their own leadership styles and strategies. Join us for this highly interactive training that you can put to IMMEDIATE application in your work setting and beyond!

Every Story Counts (Bryetta Calloway, BDC Design and Consulting)

Location:  Room 212

With the prevalence of a social and human services based programming, it is important to be able to create content and context through which to convey positive messaging. It is more important than ever to be able to harness the positive effects of your prevention efforts, and this is made possible through the planned integration of intentional infrastructure that allows for the conveyance and aggregation of personal anecdotes, stories of success and positive impact.

The Power of Youth in Prevention (Chris Ly, Delia Mendez and Moumita Sutar, Georgia Team Empowerment (GATE)/Center for Pan Asian Community Services, Inc. (CPACS)

Location:  Room 207

As coalitions and organizations look to involve the youth in their community, we have the tendency to get overwhelmed and use older practices that aren’t attractive for the youth. We have over five years of experiences, challenges and successes that we would like to share with other coalitions who are looking to move up the ladder of youth participation. This workshop will offer useful methods, tools and insight to get your coalition at the highest rung on the youth ladder of participation through recruitment, engagement and sustaining the youth in your organization. The majority of this workshop will be youth-led where two youth will share their own experiences with bringing their peers to the GATE Coalition, a Drug-Free Community Support program of DeKalb County.

Workshop Block 7

Wednesday,  Sept. 22nd from 3:30 -5:00 PM

 

Creating an Equity Toolkit: Strategies for Individualizing Paths to College and Career Success (Dr. Marina Gillmore, SPARK Center for Professional and Personal Renewal, Inc.)

Location:  Room 202

This interactive workshop will take a critically reflective look at a fundamental question of our work – how do we avoid tracking students and instead help them identify and pursue postsecondary paths that reflect their unique aspirations, strengths and needs? Participants will have the opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the intersection between who we are, what we believe and what we do and to look at the impact that our own beliefs and experiences have on our professional practices related to creating postsecondary opportunities for all students. Using foundational principles from the fields of social justice, equity pedagogy and Ubuntu education, this session will delve into the current challenges facing our ability to effectively create pathways to college and career success for all youth and will provide practical and research-based strategies for creating equity toolkits as a means of ensuring that the decisions we make regarding students’ postsecondary opportunities are rooted in strength-based and equitable practices. This workshop will particularly focus on strategies to meet the needs of our most disenfranchised, underserved and at-risk youth.

Youth Voice in Programming: A Most Effective Way To Engage Teens! (Rachel Alterman-Wallack and Susan Landrum, VOX Teen Communications)

Location:  Room 210

Take your concepts of youth engagement to the next level in order to increase your effective programming and impact among youth. This interactive workshop will help you learn strategies for building authentic youth voices within your agency or program — whether in youth advisory councils, youth in governance, youth as program leaders or program designers, etc. Through hands-on activities, dialogue and reflection, participants will be able to answer the questions: What is a youth-driven space, and how can I engage more meaningful and authentic youth leadership in my work to be more effective in achieving 21st century outcomes? We enter into this mission-driven work in support of young people. What better way to meet their needs than by engaging them in identifying them, designing activities and delivering on that mission?!

The Math Party: Sing! Dance! Exercise! Learn! (Stephanie Pasley, The Math Party, Inc.)

Location:  Room 208

Come sing, dance, exercise and learn! This electrifying presentation challenges 21st century educators to embrace the art of infusing music, dance and exercise into their existing after school math curriculum. Research indicates that the infusion of singing, dancing and exercising with curriculum content invigorates learning; it physically and mentally engages students while academically preparing and motivating them to excel. Let’s keep our students learning, moving, smart and healthy! Don’t be tardy for the Maaath Paaarty!!!

Powered By Playworks (Tobie Halliburton, Playworks Education Energized)

Location:  Sycamore

We believe that Play has the power to bring out the best in EVERY kid. In this workshop, participants will actively experience what this looks like, sounds like and feels like. Throughout our workshop we are introduced to the value of play and it’s impact on social emotional development. We lay the foundation for using play to create a safe, healthy and respectful environment for youth. During this workshop participants will also begin to discuss the various barriers that prevent youth from playing more.

Glitz, Gloss & Glam: Understanding the Unique Needs of Girls (Nicole Steele, Diamond In The Rough)

Location:  Room 211

Have you found yourself challenged in specifically reaching the unique needs of the girls in your youth program? Well, you are not alone. In today’s society the issues and concerns facing young girls today has changed drastically. Join us as we discuss many of the challenges and ways to connect with girls and help them be all they were created to be.

Afterschool Programs Get Healthy with Evidence-Based Programming (Caitlin Heitz, The OrganWise Guys)

Location:  Room 206

Afterschool settings provide an ideal environment to maintain health behaviors taught in school. Because childhood obesity is a major public health issue with many contributing factors, prevention activities should take place in community settings. This session will discuss a national project (with sites in Georgia) that uses afterschool programs and summer camps to educate children, staff and parents about healthy eating and good nutrition.

Directionality: A Practical, Comprehensive Tool which Facilitates SelfAwareness (Michael Carpenter, Synergistic Living: A Consulting Firm)

Location:  Foundry A

Research done by Hippocrates, Carl Jung, Myers-Briggs and David Keirsey has described how individual temperaments communicate along with how the different temperaments perceive and are perceived by others. Individuals may have similar needs and beliefs but different styles of communicating their message. The goal of this workshop is to become aware of individual temperaments and their strengths and how our behavior and reactions are perceived by different temperament types.

Strengthening Quality in Afterschool & OST Programs (Jim Murphy, CypherWorx)

Location:  Room 209

What makes a program good or high quality? How do you determine if your program is one? How do you improve your programs’ quality, and where do you begin? Come discuss and learn about quality in after school programs, begin to develop an improvement plan and learn about some resources that are available and how to use them.

Addressing Summer and Afterschool Hunger: Best Practices and Strategies to Successful Program Implementation (Michele Chivore and Torey Repetski, Georgia Food Bank Association)

Location:  Room 213

This workshop is designed for organizations that currently participate in or are interested in participating in federal nutrition programs for summer and afterschool. The session will allow attendees to learn about successful strategies and best practices being implemented across the state and nationally in summer and afterschool programs. The session is interactive and is designed to encourage discussion and sharing among attendees. It will allow them to leave with ideas for implementation in their communities as well as with information on funding opportunities through the Association and other funders.

Youth Development Cafe

Thursday, Sept. 23rd at 9:00 AM

The Youth Development Café is an intentional way to create a living network of conversations around questions that matter. You will join several other people at a café-style table to explore questions that really matter to your youth development work and community. Others will be sitting at nearby café tables exploring similar questions at the same time. You won’t be sitting for too long; however, because half the excitement of being part of our Youth Development Café conversation is the opportunity to move to another café table, visit with new people and cross-pollinate ideas and insights.

As the conversations connect together, collective knowledge grows and evolves. The wisdom of the group becomes more visible. The Youth Development Café is designed on the assumption that people already have within them the wisdom and creativity to confront even the most difficult challenges. Given the appropriate context and focus, it is possible for members to access this deeper knowledge about what’s important.

Join us to foster collaborative dialogue, strengthen community, spark creative insight and create new possibilities for constructive action!



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